Month: February 2016

Ella Fitzgerald – In Celebration of Icons – On their shoulder’s we stand!

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Ella Jane Fitzgerald (April 25, 1917 – June 15, 1996) was an American jazz singer often referred to as the First Lady of Song, Queen of Jazz and Lady Ella.

While Fitzgerald appeared in movies and as a guest on popular television shows in the second half of the twentieth century, her musical collaborations with Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, and The Ink Spots were some of her most notable acts outside of her solo career.

These partnerships produced recognisable songs like “Dream a Little Dream of Me”, “Cheek to Cheek”, “Into Each Life Some Rain Must Fall”, and “It Don’t Mean a Thing (If It Ain’t Got That Swing)”.

Apparently in the 50s a popular nightclub Mocambo in Hollywood were Frank Sinatra made his Los Angeles debut in 1943, and it was frequented by the likes of Clark Gable, Charlie Chaplin, Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall and Lana Turner. Ella Fitzgerald was not allowed to play at Mocambo because of her race. Fortunately for Ella, she had a powerful and unlikely benefactor, Marilyn Monroe, who of one of her biggest fans made a telephone call to the nightclub that quite possibly changed the path of her career for good into sending the elevator back down for her.

“I owe Marilyn Monroe a real debt…it was because of her that I played the Mocambo, a very popular nightclub in the ’50s. She personally called the owner of the Mocambo, and told him she wanted me booked immediately, and if he would do it, she would take a front table every night. She told him – and it was true, due to Marilyn’s superstar status – that the press would go wild. The owner said yes, and Marilyn was there, front table, every night. The press went overboard. After that, I never had to play a small jazz club again. She was an unusual woman – a little ahead of her times. And she didn’t know it.” – Ella Fitzgerald

Fitzgerald had an influence on Monroe as well, but years prior to the Mocambo phone call. Monroe was studying the recordings of Fitzgerald, it was rumoured that a vocal coach of Monroe instructed her to purchase Fitzgerald’s recordings of Gershwin music which she listened to it a numerous of times in a row. Continued study of Fitzgerald actually revealed that Ella turned Monroe into a relatively solid singer for about a decade, but those years were overshadowed by her famous “Happy Birthday, Mr. President,” tribute song to JFK in 1962 and her dress-lifting gusts of wind plus her movies.

In 1993, Fitzgerald capped off her sixty-year career with her last public performance. Three years later, Ella died at the age of 79, following years of decline in her health.

After her passing, Fitzgerald’s influence lived on through her fourteen Grammy Awards, National Medal of Arts, Presidential Medal of Freedom, and tributes in the form of stamps, music festivals, and theater namesakes.

We honour you as an Icon of our time!

LACE NEWS:
If you come across any of your creation’s and you have not been credited correctly, please get in touch with us as we do not wish to offend anyone, this page is intended to give information of what we do and what is going on around in Africa fashion and Education. We are creating awareness of information in one area to emerging designers and public to get inspired by. Much Love LACE…..

Source: Wikipedia.org  and Research

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Cicely Tyson – In Celebration of Icons – On their shoulder’s we stand!

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cicely-tyson

Cicely Tyson is an award-winning film, television and stage actress. She is known for choosing quality roles that send positive messages to women of colour. Tyson, who has a career that has spanned five decades; an ageless beauty, inspiration, an actress, and humanitarian!

1963: Cicely Tyson became the First African American to appear as a series regular on a prime time dramatic television series:  “East Side/West Side” (CBS)

Cicely Tyson was asked to audition for the series “East Side/West Side.” She landed the part of secretary Jane Foster, and she kept her natural hair, short afro style. As she rocked the style, she became an Icon to the woman of that generation. “This is what created the natural hair craze in the 60’s,” Tyson says. “I got letters from hairdressers all over the country telling me that I was affecting their business because their clients were having their hair cut off so they could ‘wear it like the girl on television.’”

14 Nov 1984, New York State, USA --- Original caption: Civil Rights activist Rosa Parks, (R), of Detroit shows off the Wonder Woman Foundation's special 1984 Eleanor Roosevelt Woman of Courage Award presented to her on November 14, 1984. At left is actress Cicely Tyson who presented the award. Parks was honored for her work in the Civil Rights movement. --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS
14 Nov 1984, New York State, USA — Original caption: Civil Rights activist Rosa Parks, (R), of Detroit shows off the Wonder Woman Foundation’s special 1984 Eleanor Roosevelt Woman of Courage Award presented to her on November 14, 1984. At left is actress Cicely Tyson who presented the award. Parks was honored for her work in the Civil Rights movement. — Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

Cicely Tyson was born in New York City on December 19, 1924 (although some believe her birth year to be 1933). She has won accolades and awards for her performances on TV, stage and in film, with credits including SounderRootsThe Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittmanand The Help. Tyson has won two Emmy Awards and a Tony Award, among other honours, over the course of her acting career. She was inducted into the Black Filmmakers Hall of Fame in 1977.

Cicely Tyson grew up in Harlem, New York. At the age of 18, she walked away from a typing job and began modelling. Tyson was then drawn to acting, though she had not been permitted to go to plays or movies as a child. When she got her first acting job, her religious mother, feeling that Tyson was choosing a sinful path, kicked her out of their home.Despite her mother’s initial disapproval (the two didn’t speak for two years before reconciling), Tyson found success as an actress, appearing onstage, in movies and on TV.

However, Tyson’s career trajectory wasn’t a smooth one; at times, she had trouble simply finding work. She flatly refused to do “blaxploitation” films, or to take parts solely for the paycheck, and was selective about the roles she chose. As she explained in a 1983 interview, “Unless a piece really said something, I had no interest in it. I have got to know that I have served some purpose here.”

More recently, Tyson appeared in The Help (2011) and in several Tyler Perry movies. And after a 30-year absence from Broadway, Tyson returned with a role in Horton Foote’s The Trip to Bountiful. The actress traveled to Texas in an effort to better understand her part in the acclaimed production—dedication that paid off when her performance won Tyson the 2013 Tony Award for best performance by an actress in a leading role in a play.

Tyson has a well-known commitment to community involvement. She co-founded the Dance Theater of Harlem after Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination. A school board in East Orange, New Jersey, wanted to name a performing arts schools after her, she only agreed to accept the honour if she could participate in the school activities. In addition to attending meetings and events, Tyson has even taught a master class at the school.

Tyson was married to Miles Davis for seven years in the 1980s.

Tyson has received numerous acting awards and nominations, and became a member of the Black Filmmakers Hall of Fame in 1977. She has also been honoured by the Congress of Racial Equality and by the National Council of Negro Women. And in 2010, the National Association for the Advancement of Coloured People presented Tyson with its 95th Spingarn Medal—an award given to African Americans who have reached outstanding levels of achievement.

Press Coverages

Even for the the fact that Cicley Tyson is in her 9o’s, this has not slow her down as in 2015 Tyson was nominated for an Emmy for her guest starring role in ABC’s How to Get Away With Murder.

 

Whenever, Cicely Tyson is out on social events engagements, whoever are her stylist’s needs to be given credits to the styles that she is commanding with the headwraps to the clothing that she wears. We absolutely love the way she has embraced her natural hair whether it short Afro to braid hair with her African inspired looks.

Styles Icons

We honour you as an Icon of our time!

Inspiration words

 

QUOTES

“I feel so guilty about the state of young people today. And I say that because our generation fought for everything. We fought to sit down at a counter, to sit on a bus. They were left with nothing to fight for.”

—Cicely Tyson

LACE NEWS:
If you come across any of your creation’s and you have not been credited correctly, please get in touch with us as we do not wish to offend anyone, this page is intended to give information of what we do and what is going on around in Africa fashion and Education. We are creating awareness of information in one area to emerging designers and public to get inspired by. Much Love LACE…..

Source: Wikipedia.org, Oprah and Research